Guiding wealth along the path of greatest good.

Guiding wealth along the path of greatest good.

Guiding wealth along the path of greatest good.

The Legacy Group, Ltd. is a Fee-Only, independent Registered Investment Advisory Firm head-quartered in Salem, Oregon serving clients throughout the Willamette Valley and Central Oregon. Our advisers are Certified Financial Planner™ professionals. Ray Sagner, CFP®, has been in practice since 1998, joined the firm in 2003 and is the current owner. Ron LeBlanc, CFP®, the firm’s founder, has been in practice since 1982 and is currently serving as a consultant to the firm. We specialize in providing financial planning advice and wealth management tailored specifically for you. While we work with a diverse clientele including foundations and sudden wealth (divorce or inheritance), our focus is clients ages 45 - 65 that are investing for retirement and planning for retirement income. Our value is in helping you develop a financial map and providing support to guide you down the path of greatest good. We are here to help you through life’s pivotal moments; planning for college, divorce, retirement, job transition, and business succession. We will be there for you because these are not merely events in your life, but part of an ongoing process from which you can benefit, grow and thrive. Take a step towards greater financial contentment and contact us today.

Guiding wealth along the path of greatest good - we take our mission seriously. Wherever you are on your financial journey, we’re here to help.

Services

 

Full-Service Financial Consulting

The Legacy Group, Ltd. offers a variety of financial consulting services.

 

Fee-Only Professional Asset Management

At The Legacy Group, Ltd., all assets are managed on a Fee-Only basis.

Blog

The Ins and Outs of Banking Online

by Ray Sagner on Aug 23, 2017

In a few short years, it seems as though the banking industry has revolutionized. It is now easier (and more convenient than ever) to tend to your banking needs, all from the comforts of your pyjamas. Gone are the notions of banking hours, and the never ending lineups when you want to deposit your paycheck.

However, if you’re anything like my parents, some of the newer online banking options seem a little too good to be safe. Rest assured that the overall consensus from both banks and computer wizards is that as long as you’re smart, online banking is secure. PC Mag suggests that the simplest way to remain secure in online banking may be the most obvious one: Use a Strong Password. “It probably doesn't matter if someone else gains unauthorized access to your Club Penguin password. You may have to do some damage control and explain that you didn't actually post those nasty messages. But a malefactor who cracks or guesses your online banking password can drain your account dry. If you memorize just one strong password, make it your online banking password.1

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Life Insurance Replacement: What You Need to Know

by Ray Sagner on Aug 23, 2017

The purchase of life insurance is typically triggered by a life event, such as marriage, the birth of a child, a home purchase or a job promotion. So, it is not uncommon for many people to change their life insurance coverage three or four or even eight times throughout their lifetime. In some cases it will require simply adding coverage, but, depending on the situation, it could require replacing one policy with another for purposes of efficiency. However, sometimes people are convinced to replace their life insurance policy for reasons more in the interests of the life insurance agent than your own. If you are ever advised to replace a life insurance policy with another, you should know that there are very strict rules and regulations in place to protect you against such replacements.

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Finance Lessons for Your Teen

by Ray Sagner on Aug 23, 2017

The current economic environment has caused most everyone to reconsider their personal finances with many people having to drastically change their spending and savings habits. Out of this economic malaise may come an opportunity to finally instill the right habits in your teens that can carry them into adulthood on the right financial footing. Just as our parents and grandparents of the Great Depression era developed deeply ingrained attitudes about finances from their experience, our teens can share in the lessons of today’s “great recession” generation. The first step is to make your teen a partner with a stake in the family financial enterprise.

For most teens, it’s not about the money. Not yet anyway. It’s more about what the money can get them – weekend entertainment, clothes, toys, cars. Money, no matter its source, is simply the means for what is important to them. When the family goes through a “belt tightening” it may be an opportunity to turn these teen expenditures into teen motivators for learning about budgeting, savings and smart financial management.

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